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US Ports Review - June 2022

As we enter summer in the US, we move into what is typically the slower season for freight and imports. There are some signs of relief at the ports compared to previous months – however the ports are still more congested and slower than in years previous to COVID.

It is important to consider that import volumes will more than likely increase in August and onwards – do not discount how quickly the ports can backup.

New filtering upgrades are now available for our raw data, as a result the maps only show container vessels, and no longer include bulk cargo vessels.


General Notes

  • The number of vessels awaiting berths at the ports around the country continues to fluctuate. With some ports lowering their backlog and others losing ground.

  • On average the ports have fewer vessels awaiting a berth compared to the peak we say from November to February.

  • However, the number of vessels awaiting a berth is still far higher than 2019.


China COVID Lockdowns June 2022 Update



The Ukraine / Russia War

  • Prior to the invasion ocean fuel was tracking 20%+ higher than the average cost throughout 2021. Post invasion we are seeing an additional 17%+ increase from late February 2022.

  • While fuel is still fluctuating, depending on the port of fueling, we see the price at 70% higher than 2021’s average price for ocean vessel fuel.

  • Diesel in the USA was $5.18 a gallon in April, which is 62% higher than this time last year.

  • Diesel in the USA at the start of May is at $5.50 a gallon, roughly 75% higher than this time last year.

  • Diesel in the USA at the start of June is at $5.53 a gallon, roughly 70% higher than this time last year. (Averaged across all US regions)


Los Angeles / Long Beach

Los Angeles / Long Beach – the vessels awaiting a berth continue to drop (however most other US ports continue to see a backlog of vessels, which is not normal for them – freight is being distributed more evenly than in previous years)

  • 24 vessels docked; May (26), April (23), March (32) January (36) December (42) November (39) October (41) September (35)

  • 17 vessels awaiting a dock; May (43) April (39) March (54) February (84) January (78) December (96) November (91) October (77) September (48)

  • LA has mandated that many vessels wait further off the coast in an effort to control pollution. As a result many vessels are now waiting 400+ miles off the coast.

Vessels outside LA/Long Beach

Oakland

The container vessel backlog is nearly clear as we start June.

  • 4 vessels docked; May (7) April (7) March (7) January (10) December (6) November (6) October (8) September (8)

  • 4 waiting (2 vessels anchored awaiting a berth in the harbor + 2 vessels outside the harbor awaiting a berth); May (6) April (9) March (19) January (13) December (10) November (8) October (7) September (7)

First photo shows inside the harbor, second shows vessels waiting outside

Seattle / Tacoma

Currently the number of vessels waiting is minimal.

  • 5 vessels docked; May (4) April (7) March (6) January (11) December (12) November (9) October (9) September (9)

  • Zero vessels awaiting a berth; May (3) April (2) March (1) January (12) December (7) November (4) October (5) September (5)

Seattle / Tacoma Port

Houston / Galveston

As most of the port terminals in this area handle bulk cargo and other commodities, there is quite a backlog at the port currently. Generally Houston can accommodate 6 container vessels docked, they have 3 currently and 8 awaiting a dock.

  • 3 vessels docked; May (5) April (4) March (4) January (6) December (4) November (2) October (5) September (12)

  • 8 vessels awaiting a berth; May (10) April (12) March (12) January (9) December (5) November (7) October (9) September (12)

Houston / Galveston Port

Miami / Ft Lauderdale

  • 7 vessel docked; May (3) April (7) March (1) January (8) December (5) November (7) September (9) October (12)

  • 3 vessels awaiting a berth; May (0) April (0) March (1) January (3) December (1) November (0) October (1) September (5)

Miami / Ft Lauderdale Ports

Savannah

Savannah is the biggest loser this month, currently showing 24 vessels awaiting a berth.

  • 5 vessels docked; May (6) April (5) March (4) January (5) December (6) November (7) October (13) September (9)

  • 24 vessels awaiting a berth; May (6) April (7) March (1) January (4) December (17) November (22) October (23) September (20)

Savannah Port - June 1, 2022

Charleston

This port has no backlog as of June 1

  • 4 vessels docked; May (4) April (5) March (4) January (4)

  • Zero vessels awaiting a berth; May (6) April (16) March (25) January (13)


Charleston - June 2022

Norfolk

Norfolk Is looking pretty normal currently, just 3 vessels pending a berth.

  • 4 vessels docked; May (4) April (5) March (4) January (12) December (16) November (14) October (10) September (7)

  • 3 vessels awaiting a berth; May (17) April (10) March (13) January (16) December (19) November (8) October (9) September (9)


Norfolk - June 2022

New York / New Jersey

The ports of NY and NJ continue to see severe congestion, brought on both by the lack of ground drivers to pick up containers and overall congestion at the port.

One factor to consider is the that terminals in the NY area do NOT operate 24/7 – their gates typically operate only from 6a – 4p. This combined with driver and equipment shortages limits the amount of cargo the port can process.

NY/NJ have a large amount of vessels awaiting a berth, at 18. This is higher than their peak amount in January of 13.

  • 12 vessels docked; May (13) April (9) March (10) January (14) December (14) November (14) October (19) September (14)

  • 18 vessels awaiting a berth; May (13) April (7) March (11) January (13) December (5) November (5) October (4) September (1)


New York / New Jersey - June 2022

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